Vaccine Distribution

COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

The COVID-19 vaccine distribution process leverages existing networks, processes and partnerships to make vaccines available across America as quickly and safely as possible. Each week, as doses are released by companies for distribution, planes and trucks transport the vaccine to states and jurisdictions across the country.

The federal government, has been working since the pandemic started to develop, manufacture, and distribute COVID-19 vaccines. Safety is our top priority as we work to make coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines available as soon as possible.

Overview of Vaccine Distribution Process

Authorization

On December 11, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the first emergency use authorization (EUA) for use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in persons aged 16 years and older for the prevention of COVID-19.

On December 18, 2020, FDA issued the second EUA for use of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in persons aged 18 years and older for the prevention of COVID-19.

Prioritization

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the initial phase of the COVID-19 vaccination program be offered to healthcare personnel and residents of long-term care facilities. Governors and jurisdictions will ultimately decide who will receive the vaccines.

Allocation

The dataset lists the allocations of doses made available for states and jurisdictions to order against. Weekly allocations are provided to states on Tuesdays; after doses are ordered by states, shipments begin the following Monday. The entire order may not arrive in one shipment or on one day, but over the course of the week; delivery sites are notified by the private shipping partners. Shipments of an FDA-authorized safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine continue to arrive at sites across America. Vaccinations began on December 14, 2020.

Distribution

Distribution of the vaccine began 24 hours after the EUA, with the first deliveries and vaccinations occurring on Monday, December 14, 2020. Shipments of an FDA-authorized safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine are arriving at sites across America. Vaccinations began on December 14, 2020.

New coronavirus variant-What do we know?

The rapid spread of a new variant of coronavirus has been blamed for the introduction of strict tier four mixing rules for millions of people, harsher restrictions on mixing at Christmas in England, Scotland and Wales, and other countries placing the UK on a travel ban.

So how has it gone from being non-existent to the most common form of the virus in parts of England in a matter of months?

The government’s advisers on new infections have “moderate” confidence that it is more able to transmit than other variants.

All the work is at an early stage, contains huge uncertainties and a long list of unanswered questions.

As I’ve written before, viruses mutate all the time and it’s vital to keep a laser focus on whether the virus’ behaviour is changing.

Why is this variant causing concern?

Three things are coming together that mean it is attracting attention:

  • It is rapidly replacing other versions of the virus
  • It has mutations that affect part of the virus likely to be important
  • Some of those mutations have already been shown in the lab to increase the ability of the virus to infect cells

All of these come together to build a case for a virus that can spread more easily.

However, we do not have absolute certainty. New strains can become more common simply by being in the right place at the right time – such as London, which had only tier two restrictions until recently.

But already the justification for tier four restrictions is in part to reduce the spread of the variant.

“Laboratory experiments are required, but do you want to wait weeks or months [to see the results and take action to limit the spread]? Probably not in these circumstances,” Prof Nick Loman, from the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium, told me.

That 70% number appeared in a presentation by Dr Erik Volz, from Imperial College London, on Friday.

During the talk he said: “It is really too early to tell… but from what we see so far it is growing very quickly, it is growing faster than [a previous variant] ever grew, but it is important to keep an eye on this.”

There is no “nailed on” figure for how much more infectious the variant may be. Scientists, whose work is not yet public, have told me figures both much higher and much lower than 70%.

But there remain questions about whether it is any more infectious at all.

“The amount of evidence in the public domain is woefully inadequate to draw strong or firm opinions on whether the virus has truly increased transmission,” said Prof Jonathan Ball, a virologist at the University of Nottingham.

How far has it spread?

It is thought the variant either emerged in a patient in the UK or has been imported from a country with a lower ability to monitor coronavirus mutations.

The variant can be found across the UK, except Northern Ireland, but it is heavily concentrated in London, the South East and eastern England. Cases elsewhere in the country do not seem to have taken off.

Data from Nextstrain, which has been monitoring the genetic codes of the viral samples around the world, suggest cases in Denmark and Australia have come from the UK. The Netherlands has also reported cases.

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

A similar variant that has emerged in South Africa shares some of the same mutations, but appears to be unrelated to this one.

Has this happened before?

Yes.

The virus that was first detected in Wuhan, China, is not the same one you will find in most corners of the world.

The D614G mutation emerged in Europe in February and became the globally dominant form of the virus.

Another, called A222V, spread across Europe and was linked to people’s summer holidays in Spain.

What do we know about the new mutations?

An initial analysis of the new variant has been published and identifies 17 potentially important alterations.

There have been changes to the spike protein – this is the key the virus uses to unlock the doorway to our body’s cells.

One mutation called N501Y alters the most important part of the spike, known as the “receptor-binding domain”.

This is where the spike makes first contact with the surface of our body’s cells. Any changes that make it easier for the virus to get inside are likely to give it an edge.

“It looks and smells like an important adaptation,” said Prof Loman.

The other mutation – a H69/V70 deletion, in which a small part of the spike is removed – has emerged several times before, including famously in infected mink.

Work by Prof Ravi Gupta at the University of Cambridge has suggested this mutation increases infectivity two-fold in lab experiments.

Studies by the same group suggest the deletion makes antibodies from the blood of survivors less effective at attacking the virus.

Prof Gupta told me: “It is rapidly increasing, that’s what’s worried government, we are worried, most scientists are worried.”

Where has it come from?

The variant is unusually highly mutated.

The most likely explanation is the variant has emerged in a patient with a weakened immune system that was unable to beat the virus.

Instead their body became a breeding ground for the virus to mutate.

Does it make the infection more deadly?

There is no evidence to suggest that it does, although this will need to be monitored.

However, just increasing transmission would be enough to cause problems for hospitals.

If the new variant means more people are infected more quickly, that would in turn lead to more people needing hospital treatment.

Will the vaccines work against the new variant?

Almost certainly yes, or at least for now.

All three leading vaccines develop an immune response against the existing spike, which is why the question comes up.

Vaccines train the immune system to attack several different parts of the virus, so even though part of the spike has mutated, the vaccines should still work.

“But if we let it add more mutations, then you start worrying,” said Prof Gupta.

“This virus is potentially on a pathway for vaccine escape, it has taken the first couple of steps towards that.”

Vaccine escape happens when the virus changes so it dodges the full effect of the vaccine and continues to infect people.

This may be the most concerning element of what is happening with the virus.

This variant is just the latest to show the virus is continuing to adapt as it infects more and more of us.

A presentation by Prof David Robertson, from the University of Glasgow on Friday, concluded: “The virus will probably be able to generate vaccine escape mutants.”

That would put us in a position similar to flu, where the vaccines need to be regularly updated. Fortunately the vaccines we have are very easy to tweak.

More on this story

Features

How to protect yourself

The new coronavirus, Covid-19, was first recognised in December 2019 in China and now has been reported in over 183 countries and territories throughout the world – and likely to infect many more in the days ahead. Many of the more sensible commentators have outlined that the risk of contracting Covid-19 is small and, in most cases, the disease it is not life-threatening. However, social media is overflowing with advice regarding Covid-19, and the facts which we should be trusting are often diluted by the mass of misinformation and doing the rounds. Because of this, we have decided to put together this blog of Coronavirus facts and myths.

Should you lock yourself away from humanity until the virus is controlled or can you, with sensible precautions, get on with your life? Are these the ‘final days’ and is humanity doomed? The travel industry has taken a massive knock and one main concern affecting this is, to misquote Shakespeare, “To Travel or Not to Travel? That is the question.”

So, let’s try to dispel some of the more common myths which are circulating and see can we get a bit of perspective to the situation…

Myth – Getting Covid-19 is a death sentence
Current information shows that only very few of those who contract this disease will die. This is mainly in the more vulnerable people – those who have an underlying health condition or are in older age. For the majority of those infected, the virus will result in typical Flu symptoms and should be fine with treatment.

Myth – Covid-19 is more contagious than the Flu or Measles
The latest information shows that it is more contagious than Flu, but a lot less than Measles. Remember, annually the Flu infects about 1 billion people with over ½ million deaths worldwide.

Myth – If one person on a plane or in a train has the disease everybody will be infected
The risk is extremely high for those within 1m of an infected person who is coughing or sneezing openly. However, if an individual uses tissues or coughs/sneezes into the elbow region, the risk will be considerably lowered.

Myth – Hand gels are the best means of protecting myself
While good quality hand-gels are helpful, careful washing of your hands, avoiding touching your face and staying away from those with obvious symptoms (flu like illness, coughing, runny eyes, fever etc) is the best way to avoid contracting the illness.

Please Note: hand gels are not effective if your hands are visibly soiled or very dirty.

Myth – Face masks will protect me from contracting Covid-19
Unless you are using a very specialised face mask, the air surrounding you will leak in around the edges of the mask and it is just as though you were not using the mask at all. Masks are helpful to catch some of the virus particles from those who already have the disease and are coughing but they need to be changed regularly and very carefully, otherwise they are a risk factor. If you are healthy, you only need to wear a mask if you are taking care of a person with suspected Covid-19 infection.

Myth – If I buy food in the supermarket and then boil or cook it for our meals that should kill any virus that might be lurking
This is true but, the problem may be from you handling the food before it is heated. Take care and wash your own hands regularly after touching anything which could have been contaminated. This hand washing advice is hugely recommended after using public transport or after being on an escalator.

Myth – There is a homeopathy vaccine available
Currently, there is absolutely no vaccine available against coronavirus Covid-19 at this time and there is not likely to be one available for some time.

Myth – All vaccines are useless against Covid-19
Technically at this time that is perfectly correct. However, we do know that most of the serious cases with this respiratory viral disease are among those with an underlying health issue. For example, in many of the more serious cases of Flu it may not be the virus itself which kills the individual but, rather an associated or secondary bacterial infection. The illness associated with Covid-19 may leave that individual more at risk of other infectious diseases. On that basis it is wise for those at a particular risk to ensure they are up to date with the yearly Flu vaccine but also to consider having vaccination cover against Pneumococcal disease which is a serious bacterial infection affecting the respiratory system

Myth – International travel is a huge risk and should always be avoided
At this time, the risk of contracting the disease from undertaking flights or visiting most countries of the world is known to be minimal. It is wise to avoid regions where there is a very significant amount of cases being reported but, for most destinations, the risk remains very small.

Myth – Covid-19 is the most deadly disease to hit mankind
While Covid-19 is spreading quickly in some regions of the world and has a mortality rate of 2-3%, it is still not by any means as deadly as other diseases. For example, SARS killed 10% of those who became infected and MERS is responsible for between 30% to 40% of deaths among those who get the disease.

Myth – The new coronavirus can be transmitted through goods manufactured in China or any country reporting Covid-19 cases
Even though Covid-19 can last on surfaces from a few hours up to several days (depending on the type of surface), it is highly unlikely that the virus will persist on a surface after being moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperatures. If you think a surface may be contaminated use a disinfectant to clean it. After touching it, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.

Myth – Coronavirus Covid-19 can be transmitted through mosquito bites
Coronavirus Covid-19 cannot be transmitted through mosquito bites. To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that it could be transmitted by mosquitoes. Covid-19 is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.

Myth – Eating garlic can help prevent infection of the new coronavirus
Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak to suggest that eating garlic has protected people from coronavirus Covid-19.

Myth – Cocaine can protect against a coronavirus
Cocaine cannot protect against any coronavirus or other infective diseases. It is an addictive, dangerous drug that should not be used under any circumstances.

Fact: Drinking alcohol does not protect you against Covid-19, and can in fact be dangerous. The harmful use of alcohol increases your risk of health problems, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

  1. Myth: Thermal scanners can detect coronavirus
    Fact: Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have a fever. However, they cannot detect people who are infected with Covid-19. There are many causes of fever.
  2. Myth: Hydroxychloroquine, Gilead’s remdesivir, and other drugs can cure coronavirus
    Fact: While several drug trials are ongoing, there is currently no proof that either hydroxychloroquine or any other drug can cure or prevent Covid-19.
  3. Myth: Adding pepper to meals prevents/cures coronavirus
    Fact: While pepper in soups and other meals can enhance their taste, it cannot prevent or cure coronavirus. Practise social distancing, wash your hands thoroughly and frequently, use hand sanitisers, and face masks to avoid coming in contact with the virus.

ALSO READ: Coronavirus LIVE Updates

  1. Myth: Coronavirus is spread through house flies and mosquitos
    Fact: So far, there is no evidence to suggest that coronavirus can be transmitted through houseflies and mosquitoes.
  2. Myth: Spraying disinfectant into your body or drinking methanol, ethanol will protect you from Covid 19
    Fact: DO NOT, under any circumstances, spray or introduce bleach or any other disinfectant into your body. These substances can be poisonous if ingested and cause irritation and damage to your skin and eyes. Bleach and disinfectant can be used to disinfect surfaces only. Methanol, ethanol, and bleach are poisons.

ALSO READ: Coronavirus vaccine update: Importance of Covid-19 drug, current status

  1. Myth: Mobile networks spread coronavirus
    Fact: Viruses cannot travel on radio waves/mobile networks. Coronavirus is spread through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks. People can also be infected by touching a contaminated surface.
  2. Myth: Exposing yourself to the sun prevents Covid-19
    Fact: Countries with hot weather, including India, have reported Covid-19 cases in large numbers. That should put an end to the claims that the virus cannot survive under the sun.
  3. Myth: Cold weather and snow can kill coronavirus
    Fact: According to WHO, the normal human body temperature remains around 36.5 degrees Celcius to 37 degrees C, regardless of the external temperature or weather. Hence, there’s no reason to believe than snow or cold weather can kill coronavirus.
  4. Myth: Taking bath with hot water prevents coronavirus
    Fact: Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching the virus. The normal body temperature remains 36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C, regardless of the temperature of shower.
  5. Myth: Ordering or buying products shipped from overseas will give you coronavirus
    Fact: WHO says that the likelihood of becoming infected with Covid-19 from a commercial package is low since it has likely travelled over several days and been exposed to different temperatures and conditions during transit.
  6. Myth: This novel coronavirus is not new, I’ve heard of it before
    Fact: The term novel coronavirus means it’s a new type of coronavirus, which hasn’t been previously detected. ‘Coronavirus’ is a family of viruses and the reason people may have seen ‘Human Coronavirus’ on labels is that this refers to previous strains of the virus.

There are several names being used for this novel coronavirus. WHO has called the disease Covid-19 but the virus itself is called SARS-CoV-2.

  1. Myth: Healthy food can prevent/cure coronavirus
    Fact: People cannot prevent Covid-19 infection through diet. However, a healthy lifestyle, including balanced diet, has a positive significance in maintaining an immune system against virus attack.
  2. Myth: Drink water every 15 minutes to avoid corona
    Fact: To date, no cure for the deadly infection has been found and we can very safely say, water alone won’t solve the problem. It can only hydrate the body and lower the risk of infection by cutting outside effects. Water can’t kill the virus.

Fact: The term novel coronavirus means it’s a new type of coronavirus, which hasn’t been previously detected. ‘Coronavirus’ is a family of viruses and the reason people may have seen ‘Human Coronavirus’ on labels is that this refers to previous strains of the virus.

There are several names being used for this novel coronavirus. WHO has called the disease Covid-19 but the virus itself is called SARS-CoV-2.

  1. Myth: Healthy food can prevent/cure coronavirus
    Fact: People cannot prevent Covid-19 infection through diet. However, a healthy lifestyle, including balanced diet, has a positive significance in maintaining an immune system against virus attack.
  2. Myth: Drink water every 15 minutes to avoid corona
    Fact: To date, no cure for the deadly infection has been found and we can very safely say, water alone won’t solve the problem. It can only hydrate the body and lower the risk of infection by cutting outside effects. Water can’t kill the virus.

Myths about Covid 19

The new coronavirus, Covid-19, was first recognised in December 2019 in China and now has been reported in over 183 countries and territories throughout the world – and likely to infect many more in the days ahead. Many of the more sensible commentators have outlined that the risk of contracting Covid-19 is small and, in most cases, the disease it is not life-threatening. However, social media is overflowing with advice regarding Covid-19, and the facts which we should be trusting are often diluted by the mass of misinformation and doing the rounds. Because of this, we have decided to put together this blog of Coronavirus facts and myths.

Should you lock yourself away from humanity until the virus is controlled or can you, with sensible precautions, get on with your life? Are these the ‘final days’ and is humanity doomed? The travel industry has taken a massive knock and one main concern affecting this is, to misquote Shakespeare, “To Travel or Not to Travel? That is the question.”

So, let’s try to dispel some of the more common myths which are circulating and see can we get a bit of perspective to the situation…

Myth – Getting Covid-19 is a death sentence
Current information shows that only very few of those who contract this disease will die. This is mainly in the more vulnerable people – those who have an underlying health condition or are in older age. For the majority of those infected, the virus will result in typical Flu symptoms and should be fine with treatment.

Myth – Covid-19 is more contagious than the Flu or Measles
The latest information shows that it is more contagious than Flu, but a lot less than Measles. Remember, annually the Flu infects about 1 billion people with over ½ million deaths worldwide.

Myth – If one person on a plane or in a train has the disease everybody will be infected
The risk is extremely high for those within 1m of an infected person who is coughing or sneezing openly. However, if an individual uses tissues or coughs/sneezes into the elbow region, the risk will be considerably lowered.

Myth – Hand gels are the best means of protecting myself
While good quality hand-gels are helpful, careful washing of your hands, avoiding touching your face and staying away from those with obvious symptoms (flu like illness, coughing, runny eyes, fever etc) is the best way to avoid contracting the illness.

Please Note: hand gels are not effective if your hands are visibly soiled or very dirty.

Myth – Face masks will protect me from contracting Covid-19
Unless you are using a very specialised face mask, the air surrounding you will leak in around the edges of the mask and it is just as though you were not using the mask at all. Masks are helpful to catch some of the virus particles from those who already have the disease and are coughing but they need to be changed regularly and very carefully, otherwise they are a risk factor. If you are healthy, you only need to wear a mask if you are taking care of a person with suspected Covid-19 infection.

Myth – If I buy food in the supermarket and then boil or cook it for our meals that should kill any virus that might be lurking
This is true but, the problem may be from you handling the food before it is heated. Take care and wash your own hands regularly after touching anything which could have been contaminated. This hand washing advice is hugely recommended after using public transport or after being on an escalator.

Myth – There is a homeopathy vaccine available
Currently, there is absolutely no vaccine available against coronavirus Covid-19 at this time and there is not likely to be one available for some time.

Myth – All vaccines are useless against Covid-19
Technically at this time that is perfectly correct. However, we do know that most of the serious cases with this respiratory viral disease are among those with an underlying health issue. For example, in many of the more serious cases of Flu it may not be the virus itself which kills the individual but, rather an associated or secondary bacterial infection. The illness associated with Covid-19 may leave that individual more at risk of other infectious diseases. On that basis it is wise for those at a particular risk to ensure they are up to date with the yearly Flu vaccine but also to consider having vaccination cover against Pneumococcal disease which is a serious bacterial infection affecting the respiratory system

Myth – International travel is a huge risk and should always be avoided
At this time, the risk of contracting the disease from undertaking flights or visiting most countries of the world is known to be minimal. It is wise to avoid regions where there is a very significant amount of cases being reported but, for most destinations, the risk remains very small.

Myth – Covid-19 is the most deadly disease to hit mankind
While Covid-19 is spreading quickly in some regions of the world and has a mortality rate of 2-3%, it is still not by any means as deadly as other diseases. For example, SARS killed 10% of those who became infected and MERS is responsible for between 30% to 40% of deaths among those who get the disease.

Myth – The new coronavirus can be transmitted through goods manufactured in China or any country reporting Covid-19 cases
Even though Covid-19 can last on surfaces from a few hours up to several days (depending on the type of surface), it is highly unlikely that the virus will persist on a surface after being moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperatures. If you think a surface may be contaminated use a disinfectant to clean it. After touching it, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.

Myth – Coronavirus Covid-19 can be transmitted through mosquito bites
Coronavirus Covid-19 cannot be transmitted through mosquito bites. To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that it could be transmitted by mosquitoes. Covid-19 is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.

Myth – Eating garlic can help prevent infection of the new coronavirus
Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak to suggest that eating garlic has protected people from coronavirus Covid-19.

Myth – Cocaine can protect against a coronavirus
Cocaine cannot protect against any coronavirus or other infective diseases. It is an addictive, dangerous drug that should not be used under any circumstances.

Fact: Drinking alcohol does not protect you against Covid-19, and can in fact be dangerous. The harmful use of alcohol increases your risk of health problems, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

  1. Myth: Thermal scanners can detect coronavirus
    Fact: Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have a fever. However, they cannot detect people who are infected with Covid-19. There are many causes of fever.
  2. Myth: Hydroxychloroquine, Gilead’s remdesivir, and other drugs can cure coronavirus
    Fact: While several drug trials are ongoing, there is currently no proof that either hydroxychloroquine or any other drug can cure or prevent Covid-19.
  3. Myth: Adding pepper to meals prevents/cures coronavirus
    Fact: While pepper in soups and other meals can enhance their taste, it cannot prevent or cure coronavirus. Practise social distancing, wash your hands thoroughly and frequently, use hand sanitisers, and face masks to avoid coming in contact with the virus.

ALSO READ: Coronavirus LIVE Updates

  1. Myth: Coronavirus is spread through house flies and mosquitos
    Fact: So far, there is no evidence to suggest that coronavirus can be transmitted through houseflies and mosquitoes.
  2. Myth: Spraying disinfectant into your body or drinking methanol, ethanol will protect you from Covid 19
    Fact: DO NOT, under any circumstances, spray or introduce bleach or any other disinfectant into your body. These substances can be poisonous if ingested and cause irritation and damage to your skin and eyes. Bleach and disinfectant can be used to disinfect surfaces only. Methanol, ethanol, and bleach are poisons.

ALSO READ: Coronavirus vaccine update: Importance of Covid-19 drug, current status

  1. Myth: Mobile networks spread coronavirus
    Fact: Viruses cannot travel on radio waves/mobile networks. Coronavirus is spread through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes or speaks. People can also be infected by touching a contaminated surface.
  2. Myth: Exposing yourself to the sun prevents Covid-19
    Fact: Countries with hot weather, including India, have reported Covid-19 cases in large numbers. That should put an end to the claims that the virus cannot survive under the sun.
  3. Myth: Cold weather and snow can kill coronavirus
    Fact: According to WHO, the normal human body temperature remains around 36.5 degrees Celcius to 37 degrees C, regardless of the external temperature or weather. Hence, there’s no reason to believe than snow or cold weather can kill coronavirus.
  4. Myth: Taking bath with hot water prevents coronavirus
    Fact: Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching the virus. The normal body temperature remains 36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C, regardless of the temperature of shower.
  5. Myth: Ordering or buying products shipped from overseas will give you coronavirus
    Fact: WHO says that the likelihood of becoming infected with Covid-19 from a commercial package is low since it has likely travelled over several days and been exposed to different temperatures and conditions during transit.
  6. Myth: This novel coronavirus is not new, I’ve heard of it before
    Fact: The term novel coronavirus means it’s a new type of coronavirus, which hasn’t been previously detected. ‘Coronavirus’ is a family of viruses and the reason people may have seen ‘Human Coronavirus’ on labels is that this refers to previous strains of the virus.

There are several names being used for this novel coronavirus. WHO has called the disease Covid-19 but the virus itself is called SARS-CoV-2.

  1. Myth: Healthy food can prevent/cure coronavirus
    Fact: People cannot prevent Covid-19 infection through diet. However, a healthy lifestyle, including balanced diet, has a positive significance in maintaining an immune system against virus attack.
  2. Myth: Drink water every 15 minutes to avoid corona
    Fact: To date, no cure for the deadly infection has been found and we can very safely say, water alone won’t solve the problem. It can only hydrate the body and lower the risk of infection by cutting outside effects. Water can’t kill the virus.

Fact: The term novel coronavirus means it’s a new type of coronavirus, which hasn’t been previously detected. ‘Coronavirus’ is a family of viruses and the reason people may have seen ‘Human Coronavirus’ on labels is that this refers to previous strains of the virus.

There are several names being used for this novel coronavirus. WHO has called the disease Covid-19 but the virus itself is called SARS-CoV-2.

  1. Myth: Healthy food can prevent/cure coronavirus
    Fact: People cannot prevent Covid-19 infection through diet. However, a healthy lifestyle, including balanced diet, has a positive significance in maintaining an immune system against virus attack.
  2. Myth: Drink water every 15 minutes to avoid corona
    Fact: To date, no cure for the deadly infection has been found and we can very safely say, water alone won’t solve the problem. It can only hydrate the body and lower the risk of infection by cutting outside effects. Water can’t kill the virus.